Inside the X1 25PRO mid-scale additive manufacturing platform from ExOne

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The X1 25PRO™ is the latest metal binder jetting additive manufacturing system from Pennsylvania-headquartered industrial 3D printing systems and services provider ExOne (NASDAQ:XONE).

With the fine, metal injection molding (MIM) powder-handling capabilities of the company’s INNOVENT+™ research 3D printer and larger, mid-scale 3D printed production, this machine is leading the charge for ExOne among burgeoning binder jet competition across the industry.

Following the X1 25PRO’s launch at Formnext 2018, 3D Printing Industry takes a closer look at the system’s technical specifications, taking a deeper dive under the hood of this new machine.

ExOne metal binder jetting

Founded in 2005 as a spinoff from global precision machining specialist Extrude Hone Corporation, ExOne is a veteran of the 3D printing industry. The company earned the exclusive license for the metal binder jet 3D printing technology developed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1996, and now its systems are installed at customer facilities in over twenty countries around the world.

With the addition of the X1 25PRO™ ExOne offers a range of eight 3D printing systems made for research & education, prototyping and production. Key industries served by ExOne binder jetting technology include aerospace, automotive, traditional foundries, heavy equipment and energy, as well as creative and educational pursuits.

Technical overview of the X1 25PRO

Adding to production, the X1 25PRO™ is built to satisfy the high standards set by traditional MIM, powder metallurgy, and manufacturing technologies. Minimum print resolution is 50 μm, with a throughput of up to 1800 cm³/hour, maintaining an excellent part quality and process reliability.

Externally, the machine measures 2300 x 1800 x 2300 mm (L x W x H). Build volume is offered as 25 liters, measuring 400 x 250 x 250 mm (L x W x H).

Patented powder processing

One of the ways in which X1 25PRO™ print quality is achieved is through ExOne’s patent-pending technologies that allow for the printing of MIM powders. As initially developed for the INNOVENT+ system, powder dispensing in the X1 25PRO™ is achieved through ExOne’s latest state-of-the-art recoating technology, which results in a consistent and uniform powder bed.

Built on long standing MIM powder processing, the X1 25PRO™ also promises the ability to work with a wider range of standard materials. At present, 316L, 304 L, and 17-4PH stainless steels; Inconel 718® and 625; M2 and H11 tool steels; cobalt chrome; copper; tungsten carbide cobalt and many other alloys are 3D printable on the X1 25PRO™. Minimum powder size for the system is 9μm.

Order X1 25PRO

ExOne is currently accepting orders of the X1 25PRO™ for delivery in late 2019. For more information, contact ExOne’s Sales Team at [email protected].

Rick Lucas, Chief Technology Officer at ExOne concludes, “Our X1 25PRO™ is the first of two machines that we are introducing by the end of the first half of 2019, utilizing our state-of-the-art patent pending MIM powder processing machine technologies.”

“We believe these new production machines will be the most flexible and highest performing binder jetting machines in the market.”

Nominate ExOne and the X1 25PRO in the 2019 3D Printing Industry AwardsFor more of the latest 3D printer releases subscribe to our newsletter, like us on Facebook and follow 3D Printing Industry on Twitter.

For career opportunities, search 3D Printing JobsFeatured image shows the X1 25PRO™ machine. Photo via ExOne

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