Tag: Georgia Institute of Technology

Georgia Tech, UConn, and UMass Lowell establish 3D printing research center

The Georgia Institute of Technology, University of Connecticut (UCONN), and the University of Massachusetts Lowell are collaborating to establish a National Science Foundation (NSF) Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC) for 3D printing. The I/UCRC will operate from all three universities to form the Science of Heterogeneous Additive Printing of 3D Materials (SHAP3D) center, addressing emerging challenges... Read More »

Georgia Tech and Beida 3D print engineering strength origami

A 3D printing research collaboration between Georgia Institute of Technology and China’s Peking University (Beida) has yielded transformable structures that can support up to 100 times their own weight. A continuation of previous studies demonstrating self-assembling tensegrity structures, the results of this research is a step forward for engineering applications of origami structures. Origami assemblies tuned to be... Read More »

Researchers Make Strong, 3D Printed Expandable Origami Structures for Engineering Applications

Rearranging the same units can change a structure from one that can support a load 100 times its weight to one that will fold flat under the same load. [Image: Soft Matter] A collaborative team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology, the Beijing Institute of Technology, and Peking University are using 3D printing... Read More »

3D Printing news Sliced, GE Additive, Sketchfab, FILOALFA and Tecnun

Today’s Sliced answers the questions: what is 4D printing? How does it compare to 3D printing? Will we soon be riding bionic aircraft? All this and more from GE Additive, Sketchfab, FILOALFA and Tecnun. Protecting iconic statues Students are working with Project Regrind to convert plastic water bottles into 3D printing filament. Bottles are ground... Read More »

3D printed microneedles present pain-free alternative to syringes

With an FFF 3D printer researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas (UT Dallas) now have a new low-cost method of making microneedle arrays – a small syringe-alternative patch for administering drugs. The method combines a commercially available desktop 3D printer with a chemical etching technique. It enables the creation of ultra-fine microscopic pins in a... Read More »